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A national "center-without-walls" for rapid transformation of emerging point-of-care technologies into commercially viable, clinically focused solutions for improving primary healthcare.

As the number of primary care providers diminishes and the need for primary care increases, there is an urgent need to increase the capacity of providers to care for more patients without a decrease in the quality of care and without unduly burdening the providers, patients, or their families. 

Funded in 2012 for a five-year period by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) Point-of-Care Technologies Research Network (POCTRN), CIMIT is creating a national “center-without-walls” for rapid transformation of emerging point-of-care (POC) technologies into commercially viable, clinically focused solutions for improving primary healthcare.

Specific Aims

  • Apply CIMIT’s innovation model to create clinically-driven point-of-care solutions that address critical areas of unmet need in primary healthcare.
  • Identify and assess unmet primary care needs and develop performance criteria where point-of-care technology solutions would have the highest impact.
  • Select the most promising point-of-care technologies and develop them into proof-of-concept prototypes.
  • Test and evaluate prototype performance in simulated clinical environments and clinical “living laboratories” relative to clinical performance and implementation criteria.
  • Transition prototypes that meet performance specifications into commercially licensable or start-up company opportunities.
  • Train and educate relevant stakeholders in the innovation process as it applies to meeting healthcare needs.
  • Disseminate “lessons learned” and best practices in innovation methodology and process both nationally and internationally in collaboration with other POCTRN Centers.

Define and Prioritize

In general, two POC technology-enabled pathways to increase primary care capacity are:

  • To introduce point-of-care technologies eliminating unnecessary steps and re-work to increase the efficiency of operations.
  • To offload selected testing and self-monitoring capabilities to the home setting for patient self-management. 

On an annual basis, in collaboration with the MGH Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation, under the leadership of Susan Edgman-Levitan, unmet clinical needs in primary care where technology-enabled solutions could be of benefit will be defined and prioritized.